Anyone Using Biogas?

Discussion in Utilities started by remnant • May 12, 2016.

  1. remnant

    remnantActive Member

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    Biogas is a very cheap form of energy which is a win win situation both for the users and the environment. For one, after the initial installation costs, no other capital outlay is required. There are also improvised forms of biogas where a plastic collapsible tank is used as a reservoir. Biogas is also renewable and suitable in rural areas where people farm cattle. Nowadays, its being packaged in cylinders for sale at low prices in urban areas.
     
  2. Denis Hard

    Denis HardWell-Known Member

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    I read somewhere that biogas can be used to generate electricity but the whole thing seemed to be quite complicated so I never bothered. As for using biogas for cooking I've never tried it but might give it a try in future when I decide to permanently live a quiet life in the country.
     
  3. explorerx7

    explorerx7Active Member

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    For persons who live in rural areas, I believe it would be a good option for them to seek to produce biogas for cooking. wherever there is an availability of animal dung and vegetable compost, then there is a good platform for producing the gas. The gas is derived through the process of utilising biodigesters, which are not very expensive to construct, to convert compost and waste to methane gas.
     
  4. xTinx

    xTinxWell-Known Member

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    First time I'm hearing of biogas but it seems pretty interesting because it's formed in the same way as fossil fuel but with lesser carbon emission (probably because it's not heavily processed like most of the refined oil we use to fuel vehicles and machines). I may use it but the user himself has to be innovative.
     
  5. judyd1

    judyd1New Member

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    I will have to do some more research, as this is the first time I have even heard about "biogas"? At first, I thought it was a Spanish word, then realized it must be a combination of bio + gas, right? And from some of the comments, I'm also guessing that it uses animal dung to create the gas. This is actually a pretty good idea. For a lot of people who have a few cows, or horses, or even sheep or goats, they have a ready source of "fuel" that they can use.

    You mentioned an initial outlay of money to get the biogas system set up. I just wonder if that is something that is economically within reach of the majority of people who would benefit from this? I can't see the utility companies just allowing everyone to switch over to biogas even if it would be very good for the environment. If it means the potential loss of millions (billions?) of dollars, they're definitely going to lobby against it, or throw up as many obstacles as possible.
     
  6. Vinaya

    VinayaActive Member

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    We have a biogas plant installed in our house. We use cattle waste, human waste and other organic waste as the biogas feed. We use biogas to cook food. Our biogas plant is 8 square meter, which can cook 4 times meal to the family of 6 people. The maintenance cost is zero. We installed about 7 years ago, and since 7 years we have not spend a single penny for cooking gas.
     
  7. tonyb

    tonybActive Member

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    This is my first time to hear of Biogas as a form of energy. The good thing about this method of energy production is that it's cheap according to what I gather here. I am going to make more research on this biogas to understand more about it. I may benefit from it and pass the good info to others
     
  8. Alexandoy

    AlexandoyWell-Known Member

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    I have a friend who bought a 1-hectare farm in the province. It was intended to be a vacation place. It has a small piggery of 10 heads and the waste matter of the pigs become fuel for the biogas stove. It is a simple system where the tank is made of concrete which holds the waste matter. The vapor or air passes thru a hose that is connected to 3 stoves which they use for cooking their food and also for cooking the food of the pigs. I guess it is a doable thing but not in the city because of the odor that emanates from the tank.