Breeding Pets To Earn Money?

Discussion in Pets started by sidney • Jul 10, 2015.

  1. sidney

    sidneyWell-Known Member

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    If you have a "sellable" pet that breeds like rabbits, hamsters, purebred dogs and cats, horses, etc. would you sell them just so that you can earn cash? Are you willing to be a backyard breeder? Or you would just give them away for free to deserving friends and relatives? Share your thoughts.
     
  2. Theo

    TheoWell-Known Member

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    It does come with responsibility as in making sure they are healthy and people will want verification of the breed as well. I think with certain animals like horses, they are bred for a purpose, but domestic pets like rabbits, cats and dogs I think it's cruel to breed them. Some people will do it, but I am sure it's hard work and you have to have lots of room and always have the vet on call.
     
  3. rightct

    rightctActive Member

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    You could make a profitable business out of this, sure, but it takes a lot more work than one might think and requires a hell of a teamwork for it to be sustainable. You can't just go in this business and expect clients and therefore money fall from the sky. You have to invest, invest, invest... not only time, but money as well. Be prepared for the worst, also!
     
  4. JosieP

    JosiePWell-Known Member

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    I personally don't believe in this at all. There are far too many homeless animals being put down every single day or starving on the streets.. and breeders are profiting off the pretty.. making matters so much worse. Not to mention those that don't put the required time, energy and care into what they're doing and end up with diseased/dead animals. Yes, it's good money for those who want to do it though.
     
  5. hellavu

    hellavuActive Member

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    Welll... I think breeders are a step ahead of pet shops for someone who wants to buy an animal, but I would not really want to do it myself -- since I always prefer to refer people to shelters etc.
     
  6. Penny

    PennyActive Member

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    I think being a responsible and humane breeder is a business that takes skill, dedication, and education. I would not embark on that lightly.

    Casual breeders of small animals are largely responsible for the increasing rates of harmful bacteria and perpetuation of inheritable lethal diseases like mega-colon in rats.

    If a person is going to breed animals they should take their responsibility to the animals they produce very seriously.
     
  7. sidney

    sidneyWell-Known Member

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    @Theo@Theo, Some people sell their purebreed (?) cats and dogs at a cheaper price because they don't come with papers or they say that the pet hasn't had any shots yet that's why they're cheap. I remember browsing Siamese kittens online that was half the price of the ones with vet papers. I'm not picky though, so given spare cash I would buy pets without papers.
     
  8. Penny

    PennyActive Member

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    If you cheap pet turns out to have parvo-virus or a neurological defect they suddenly become a very expensive pet. Many buyers of cheap listings of "cool" breeds like teacup size pups have learned that.

    If I was not going to buy from a known breeder I could visit who takes the animals to a vet, well I might as well get a rescue pet who has an unknown history but at least I am saving a life.
     
  9. sidney

    sidneyWell-Known Member

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    You do have a point, so that's one thing that you have to consider when buying pets without papers. You might end up paying more for your vet bill. I also haven't heard of teacup dogs yet, but I also am not in favor of such unscrupulous cross breeding. It has many health risks:

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  10. Theo

    TheoWell-Known Member

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    I know my friend bought a cat and they hadn't declared an illness and it cost her hundreds in vet fees. Maybe where you are it's not so strict, but in the US I know it is. It depends how much you sell it for and if you have papers, you will get a better price, plus no hassle afterwards in case of any issues.
     
  11. Corzhens

    CorzhensWell-Known Member

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    I am a dog lover and breeding crossed my mind before. Since our first dog was a female, I had plans to breed it so I contacted a stud. In fact, there were 2 studs that did it but unfortunately, our dog did not get pregnant. Maybe that's an eye opener because if ever our dog had puppies, I wouldn't have the heart to sell them. So money is not in the issue anymore but the puppies. And my husband wouldn't want our house to be a pet shop.
     
  12. sidney

    sidneyWell-Known Member

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    @Theo@Theo, If the seller deliberately hid the illness, then that's just unethical. If they weren't aware because the kitten hasn't had her shots yet then that's forgivable. Over here, it really isn't strict, sellers can place an ad online and make a deal.

    @Corzhens@Corzhens, What is the breed of your dog? Well if you get attached easily to animals then selling them is definitely not an option. However, I think rodents, pigs, chickens, etc. are easier to let go and sell, don't you think? They are not as "pettable" as dogs and cats.
     
  13. Corzhens

    CorzhensWell-Known Member

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    Our first dog that we tried to breed is a mix of mongrel and some unknown breed. If she had been pregnant, the puppies would be cute because the stud was a poodle and the next stud was a spitz. And since I treat my dogs as part of the family, my husband said that for sure those puppies would be my babies so how could we sell them?

    Here is the photo of Jedi, our first dog together with our second dog Epoy, that brown pekingese. PB250982.JPG
     
  14. JosieP

    JosiePWell-Known Member

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    Exactly.. ditto. And it just breaks my heart, keeping an animal pregnant for profit.. and birthing and feeding and losing her babies over and over (hm.. sounds like the dairy industry lol). Nope, not for me :(
     
  15. wannatakeawalk

    wannatakeawalkNew Member

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    Extremely irresponsible and unethical to do this unless you are knowledgeable in veterinary medicine and breeding practices. I believe breeders require licenses and permits in most place as well. People who are 'back yard breeders' are not called this as a compliment. They do not follow proper breeding practices (such as making sure any genetic defects are not carried on) or care for animals properly.
     
  16. sidney

    sidneyWell-Known Member

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    @Corzhens@Corzhens, Your dogs are quite cute! How much does a Pekingese cost? And since they are indoor dogs, how often do you give them a bath? Our outdoor dog rarely gets baths, lol.

    @JosieP@JosieP, It is kinda sad for the mom, but some moms eventually turn against their offspring after some time, I witnessed it with my cat before, and I wonder why. If the breeding wasn't planned and the family can't keep all the offspring, then they also have no choice but to sell it or give it away, right?
     
  17. Jessi

    Jessi<a href="http://www.quirkycookery.com">QuirkyCooke

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    I have sold them in the past, but that was the point of me breeding in the first place.

    If I had a friend or relative that wanted them at that point, then sure, I might give it away for free. I wouldn't breed any to specifically give away, though, because I find that irresponsible.
     
  18. troutski

    troutskiWell-Known Member

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    I'd have to say that breeding pets to earn money as an amateur doing it is unethical in and of itself. You'd be directly profiting from animals, despite the fact that thousands of them are in shelters right now. Sure, small rodents aren't necessarily in shelters, but you're upping the population of whatever animal simply for the sake of profiting from that action. I wouldn't recommend doing that, and I'm sure a lot of local areas ban such practices on a large scale to prevent such issues.
     
  19. Corzhens

    CorzhensWell-Known Member

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    We never buy dogs because we cherish more when those dogs were given to us as gifts. Our first pekingese that came from a champion in a dog show would cost $1,000 for a puppy. My colleague who gave me that pekingese could sell almost double that amount since pekingese was rare during that time (2002) although it is still quite rare now but the price has gone down a bit.
     
  20. JosieP

    JosiePWell-Known Member

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    My oldest cat was abandoned by her feral mother (she was sick) so I do understand that. It wouldn't have happened without human hands though.. we've created the over population and the problems/disease they face. It's just my personal opinion that humans should not be profiting from animals. In this case, on the off chance that the animal will turn on her babies anyway, which won't be the case 100% of the time. Animals create bonds just like humans do and losing one baby is heartbreaking enough. It may pass (which is grasping at straws, for me).. but to have it happen over and over and over again. Forcing them through pregnancy after pregnancy and the risks involved. Forcing the pups to separate from their mother; it makes them so sad. Maybe I'm being dramatic putting myself in their shoes (paws? lol), but I don't think so.. it's only acceptable now because profiting from animal suffering is the human way. So much so that it's not seen as animal suffering. What happens in the wild, naturally, doesn't give us permission to use it to our advantage and recreate their pains on a grander scale so we can pay the bills.

    Again, this is just my opinion.. I see no humane way to do this, but my definition of humane is different than most it seems. If I wouldn't do it to a person, I wouldn't do it to an animal.
     
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