Cheap and easy way to heat a room, works without electricity.

Discussion in Heating started by Happyflowerlady • Nov 15, 2013.

  1. Zyni

    ZyniWell-Known Member

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    Thanks for sharing this, Happyflowerlady. I had seen a "system" for sale last winter that looked very much like what you were talking about here. I didn't want to pay that much to find out if it worked, but this is affordable enough to give it a try. This is a great tip, and it would be very useful during a power outage as well. Also good for those times when it's just a bit chilly and a sweater isn't quite cutting it, but you'd rather not turn on the heat.
     
  2. xTinx

    xTinxWell-Known Member

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    The information's helpful. It may work, though I have not personally applied this method. I'm worried about not being able to do this correctly and ending up setting fire to our house - God forbid. The tropics' also not an ideal place due to the harsh winds here. Perhaps I can use this during the day where you can really see what you're doing and when the weather's mighty cold.
     
  3. Zyni

    ZyniWell-Known Member

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    That makes sense, Tinx. One needs to be very careful using lighted candles. If people are more comfortable with an item built for this purpose, rather than trying to create a makeshift version, I found one with the name Kandle Heeter. There are probably other brands as well. I think it also depends on how cheaply one can obtain the tea lights, to determine if this is a good cost saver or better suited for emergency purposes.
     
  4. Aurora

    AuroraMember

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    I would love to save the cost of energy in my house. It seems to be a neat idea but it is unlikely will be working for me. I am afraid that I will put my house on fire as my house is small and full of stuff. Moreover, I do not like the smell and smoke of candles result from a few days of those tea candles. This is good in theory but not practical in real terms for my situation.
     
  5. Winnie

    WinnieActive Member

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    Sounds like an idea I would try only if I didn't have any other heat source, or if I was really low on cash and just really could not afford to turn my heater on.
     
  6. wulfman

    wulfmanActive Member

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    For anyone in the Eastern or Southern parts of the US this information could be priceless (pun). The low pressure typhoon that hit Alaska is supposed to drop temperatures across much of the United States and produce sub zero temperatures in the next few days. It is also expected to lead to a harsher winter and more snowstorms for the East Coast.

    Also I read an interesting thing on another forum. Snow as insulation. There are houses in Alaska and states that receive a lot of snowfall, that pack snow around their homes and get their homes to temperatures up to 60 F ! I found that quite amazing.
     
    #26Nov 10, 2014
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2014
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