Homeschooling

Discussion in 'Toys, Kids & Baby Stuff' started by gracer, Mar 29, 2016.

  1. gracer

    gracerActive Member

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    Thank you for sharing your experience. Actually, my greatest fear when it comes to homeschooling my child is me and my ability to really give it my best. I still have doubts whether I would be able to perform well as my child's own teacher and I'm afraid of it because I know that he's the one who will be greatly affected from it. Thank you so much for your advice. :)
     
  2. ashley0323

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    My oldest daughter (5) would of been going into kindergarten this year, but we decided to give homeschooling a try, instead of public schooling. We truly believe the public school system has gone downhill, not to mention, the area that we live in is not the best. We intend on getting our kids into sports and other activities, that way they also get the "social" side of school.
     
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  3. JosieP

    JosiePWell-Known Member

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    I would join all of the homeschooling groups you can find (Facebook etc) and voice your concerns. You will always find reasons not to do it (especially from a bunch of people that don't know anything about it), but you need to hear from others why you absolutely can and should. We've all had our doubts, that's normal. If you believe in it and it's what you want, nothing is stopping you and there are plenty of ways to get over the hurdles yourself or with the help of your community and other homeschoolers. You are absolutely capable. Find those groups.. they'll help you see it.
     
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  4. gracer

    gracerActive Member

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    Thank you for your suggestion @JosieP@JosieP. :) I've been reading up a lot about homeschooling and all of the articles Ive read from homeschooling parents themselves were all positive and encouraging. I guess I'm in a phase where I'm still torn between choosing it and continuing to educate my child in a regular school.
     
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  5. ashley0323

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    I have a five year old who was suppose to start kindergarten this year. We decided on homeschooling instead, because, lets face it, public schools are NOT what it used to be. My child can learn at her own pace and offer extra attention in subjects that she just doesnt understand. We do extra activities such as gymnastics and swim, that way she is still social with others her age. I have heard tons of positive feedback reguarding our decision, yet, theres that one family member who thinks its the WORST idea they have ever heard. Do what YOU think is best.
     
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  6. Theo

    TheoWell-Known Member

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    I'm only against homeschooling after the age of about 10-12 years old because this is the age children need to learn to interact more with other humans, and have the basic reading and writing skills already.

    Before that I think it's okay to do if there are no good schools, if they are a bit rough, or there are other reasons like a learning difficulty. From what I see most of my friends prefer to find good play groups and activities for the children to join in where they can interact if they homeschool or only go to nursery a few times a week.
     
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  7. GreenPersimmon

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    My mom took my little brother out of public schooling because the teachers would let my brother get bullied by the kids. He would come home with bruises and cuts on him but the teacher wouldn't know how he got them. He does K12, though I can't remember what the name of the school. He's been doing much better and now he can read by himself.
     
  8. Lushlala

    LushlalaWell-Known Member

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    I personally don't go for home schooling as a blanket option for anyone who wants to go down this route because like most people here, my concerns would be just how qualified and equipped these parents are to deliver good quality education to their children. I don't know if we can safely say that every single parent who offers their child home schooling has the right skills to adequately offer them the level of education offered in the traditional classroom set up. I mean, is home schooling even properly regulated? For countries where it's allowed, what sort of OFSTED inspections or the equivalent are in place to ensure that that's the case?

    I agree with Theo, it could work for younger children but when they to a certain age, I strongly feel they need to be in school with their peers and receiving all the support they can only receive from a traditional school system. I mean, I'm a teacher by profession, but I couldn't imagine being able to provide my child with the full support they need across ALL subject areas. A

    re these parents actually qualified, and do they follow the curriculum that's in place or do they just teach their children whatever they feel is required? Do they all even have the right resources? How do they account for those areas where they fall short? Home schooling is not something anybody could really sell to me, I'm afraid. We could discuss and debate the topic until we're all blue in the face, but I think this is probably something we'll all have to respectfully agree to disagree on :)
     
  9. Theo

    TheoWell-Known Member

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    I do find in the US it's more acceptable to homeschool, but I still think it should be because of issues rather than a parent thinking they can do a better job. I know people keep pushing that TED video of the kid who gave a lecture on how homeschooling gave him the edge. I actually found it quite arrogant, because not all parents have an option to homeschool and to say it's better implies that parents who do send their children to school are 'bad' parents.

    My mother was a teacher and would teach us as little kids, but there is no way even a teacher (unless they are actively working) would know what the latest curriculum is and how exams are being set. You need to consider that, and not everything can be gleaned from the internet or books.

    On a social level, the picking on people, and the bad things are going to happen in real life at college or at work. Trying to shield them from that will only weaken them as adults unprepared for the realities of human and social interactions and hope to cope with them.
     
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  10. JosieP

    JosiePWell-Known Member

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    Most of my family and many friends work in the system and they all agree with it. A couple even homeschool now. The curriculum actually does get listed online for anyone to follow. It's not hard to find what you need or the help when you need it. We underestimate kids and humans in general.. the homeschooling debate always proves it. It's not for everyone, but it's proven time and again to outshine schooling in all aspects when it is a possibility.

    And I never waste my time selling homeschooling to naysayers lol. It's not about them; they know so little about it and are committed to the one path mentality. I simply stand up for it and refute the misinformation ;) for the homeschoolers or potentials reading, not for those completely closed to it.
     
    #30JosieP,Sep 6, 2016
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 9, 2016
  11. Lushlala

    LushlalaWell-Known Member

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    I couldn't have said it better myself, @Theo! I just feel like you'll probably have a lot of children who miss out and fall through the cracks. There's also the danger of teaching them all the wrong things, especially if parents rely predominantly on the internet because as we all know it IS the hive all things weird and wonderful, many of which aren't very accurate. They bear some semblance of accuracy, but if you're not qualified in a specific area, it's very easy to be led astray and pass on the wrong information.

    I'm just glad homeschooling is not universally legal, with most countries making it a legal obligation for parents to register their children with recognised schools, where they can benefit from the education they all deserve. I mean, let's face it; some parents are so ill equipped for that sort of thing that even the bad teachers would be better placed to teach their children.
     
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  12. JosieP

    JosiePWell-Known Member

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    When I said the curriculum can be found online, I meant what is expected of each grade. Curriculum is purchasable. The same curriculum schools use and, thankfully, better. You can still get grades and diplomas if that's the path you take. There is still a TON of help out there for those in need of it... even from teachers lol.

    If school was the answer everyone would be well versed in all subjects, no? If they aren't, then how is school the answer? How do so many children fall through the cracks? Why are so many graduating with subpar knowledge? Why are so many suffering without the help they need to get by and get the grades and the jobs and the mental health?

    School harms far more than homeschooling. Some thrive, many more don't. Of course we can find neglected children in a homeschooling environment, but that has nothing to do with homeschooling and everything to do with parenting. And as I said, if the naysayers truly believe in the school system, they should have total faith in the parents that come from that system and pass that knowledge to their children.. along with the perfectly accessible, reliable, thorough, legitimate curriculum you can buy from a zillion sources these days. Because homeschooling has proven itself and it's growing faster than ever :)

    PS: I have an early graduate and another in the making. They are in no way exceptions...

    Naysayers should look into it before condemning it. Even then, most are committed to misunderstanding it and believing what they were conditioned to believe. Which is fine! Absolutely. It changes nothing; homeschooling and homeschoolers will continue to thrive :)

    We're human... learning is what we do.
     
  13. Theo

    TheoWell-Known Member

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    Parents that are qualified and able to homeschool are in the minority, because many parents do have to go and work. You only have to look at the statistics that there are many single parent hosueholds; how could they possibly afford to homeschool.

    Those who have the luxury of choosing should consider the majority of people that have to work long hours or do several jobs to keep a roof over their heads.

    It's also down to the ability of the child. My mother was a teacher and taught us when we were toddlers to read. I was bright and learned quickly, and my brother was slow. Homeschooling would have been bad as I was more advanced than he was, and it created rifts between us as young children. School gave him the chance to excel at art which he couldn't have done at home. He also won a place at art school as people came to the school to look at the students work, something he could not have had if he had been homeschooled.
     
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  14. JosieP

    JosiePWell-Known Member

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    I fully understand it's not a possibility for everyone.. I did say some thrive in the system and for many it's necessity or preference :) I don't think homeschooling should be the only option.. or I'd be no better than those saying school should be. Freedom is a wonderful thing.

    Also, homeschooling is what you make of it. My youngest is an artist and has no shortage of admirers and possibilities. My oldest was considered "slow" in school and went on to jump grade levels when he came home. There is nothing holding homeschooled children back. Not even us "ill equipped" homeschool parents lol. If it doesn't work out for some, well, that happens.. but it's usually a parent not realising they're fully capable and/or there is a ton of room for adjusting methods. There are just as many ways to homeschool as there are homeschoolers.
     
    #34JosieP,Sep 7, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2016
  15. Lushlala

    LushlalaWell-Known Member

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    I'm again backing everything Theo said. Of course, I'm not saying all parents are ill-equipped to homeschool their children. My burning question really is how many of them ARE. Teachers as we all know are all professionally trained to impart knowledge and educate. Not all parents are educated, and and even less are professionally trained for such a job. Does the US government even have a robust system through which to assess, monitor and track the whole homeschooling concept to make absolutely certain that each child who receives such an education is properly taught?! What kind of support do they actually receive? What about resources, do they have access to those? These 9and a whole lot of others) are the types of concerns I have about homeschooling. Now if we were talking about home tutoring i.e where the parents employ adequately trained tutors to do that, I'd understand. But the whole homeschooling idea as a blanket provision, now I find that worrying.
     
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  16. Aree Wongwanlee

    Aree WongwanleeActive Member

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    At one time, I did think of doing homeschooling. The government schools were not really doing much in terms of education. They were more like paper mills where the children were processed into obedient citizens who contribute faithfully to the national economy. However, it was not an easy task. In the end, I had to settle for a compromise. I sent my children to regular school and supplemented their education with what I could do at home.

    If you are really committed to doing it, there are lots of resources available on the Web. Just ask Uncle Google about it.
     
  17. Theo

    TheoWell-Known Member

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    As a former teacher who used to prepare lesson plans and having friends as teachers (I went to a University renowned for teacher training) I would tutor my children at home (when I have some), but would not homeschool them because I would be denying them the skills that needed to learn in life.

    I also would not have all the resources available such as new textbooks, or know what criteria exams in all subjects were tested on. Things do change, and very few people would be able to know about all subjects in depth.

    Most that seem to homeschool do it because they don't feel the system is good enough, that they can do a better job, or because the child is being bullied. In the latter case I can see that as a valid option, but not long term as it won't help them in adulthood.

    What if the child has problems learning or the parent has more than one child to teach, how do they cope? Schools do have means and resources to address this.

    Having a child graduate early does not mean they will be more successful. I can see there are some ambitious parents out there, but a clever child doesn't guarantee success, as there are many intelligent and quick learners who never find a careers that suits them and the pressure gets to them.
     
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  18. JosieP

    JosiePWell-Known Member

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    I get all of the concerns.. I had them myself.

    If an early graduate makes no difference, than how does graduating at all make a difference? You can graduate without a full understanding of anything you did in school. I see that more often than not. The difference between many homeschool graduates and school graduates is that the homeschooler had an education geared to their specific needs and got all the help they needed. Ideally, of course, before I get jumped on for that lol.

    It depends on where you live if the children are assessed or not. Where I live now, you have the choice to opt out completely. You just have to register with the nearest school. You can also enroll, where you follow the curriculum exactly (I believe) and a teacher keeps up with your progress and is available for any help you need. There is always help available to the homeschooler regardless. Feel free to call the authorites on anyone who doesn't live up to your standards though. You may get lucky and catch someone doing it all wrong, in which case, you'll all be right about homeschooling in general, emiright? lol.

    There are also growing homeschool communities everywhere now. Again, check the stats on how well they do before condemning. Yes, some parents fail, can't cope or find it wasn't a fit.. then they have school to fall back on. What does the schooled child do when they aren't getting their needs met? You can list whatever you want, they are failing FAR too many children. We're ignoring the massive problems with the current system, all to condemn something so misunderstood because it doesn't fit with how most are conditioned. There is no one way to do things. I can't believe people need to be reminded of this in 2016.

    Nothing is stopping a child from attending post secondary, if that's what they need to move forward with their goals. In fact, many universities prefer homeschoolers. They take control of their education; don't need their hands held. It depends on the school how the person will get in.

    The fact that many believe you have to be trained to teach is laughable, but that's my own opinion. No, not everyone is equipped and obviously it isn't a fit for them.. but how is the current school system equipped for all children?

    I've already mentioned resources.. there are far more accessible to the homeschooler than in school. School is very limiting in that aspect, in my opinion. Everyone is free to supplement though, of course. There are communities as well.. for trips, lessons, tutoring, volunteering, entertainment etc etc. The schools are always there to help when needed as well. When a parent has faith in their abilities and seeks out these communities, their children will have more and better access to this "real world" everyone imagines a schooled child knows more about while they're sitting at a desk all day, unable to speak or go to the bathroom without permission lol.

    Like I said, it's what you make it.

    Anyway, I'm done defending it. Being curious is one thing, but being completely closed while third degreeing it is insulting. As is assuming nobody is capable of learning without a trained instructor. I don't know about anyone else, but I learned far more on my own than I ever did in school. Same goes for many famous minds (not that I'm anywhere near genius lol). There is no one size fits all and to suggest there is is wrong on so many levels. Children deserve better than that. They deserve options. They deserve more credit! As do their parents. I know not everyone can do it and not everyone should, but to dismiss it completely based on a very small minority when school has them beat in the neglect department times a zillion? My children are intelligent, well rounded, happy human beings and that, along with the many others who prove homeschooling to be an amazing option, is all that matters to me.

    I hope, unlike the naysayers, anyone still interested in homeschooling after this will keep digging to ease their concerns. If you believe in it, you can do it! There is a wealth of information and help out there, specific to your area. So much luck to you.. and enjoy!

    Have a good day :)
     
    #38JosieP,Sep 8, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2016
  19. rz3300

    rz3300Active Member

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    This is a tough issue, but an interesting one nonetheless. You bring up a good point here though, and these days I would think it would be easy to sow how certain schooling structures are better for certain children. I am going through a little of this with my family right now, as our cousin is homeschooling her boy, and my mother being a life-long public school teacher is not really happy about it. It is their choice though, and I couldn't care less, but I think it just shows the sensitivity of the issue, if nothing else.
     
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  20. Lushlala

    LushlalaWell-Known Member

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    Not everyone is lucky enough to have bright children, or to be blessed with the level of intelligence required to educate their children. I'm not sure why this has become such an emotionally charged debate with people against homeschooling being accused of condemning it. As far as I can tell there are two schools or thoughts that aren't meeting in the middle, and as mature adults, I would have thought we could respect one another's sentiments on the matter, without resorting to accusations such as these :)

    @Theo@Theo....I also speak from the standpoint of being an experienced and professional teacher. I find it baffling that there's the idea that being a parent far outweighs the degree to which I can teach and impart knowledge, something I worked so hard to achieve. But I guess the quality of teacher training in the US is probably very lacking (I'm not familiar with it), to the point where most parents are better placed to teach than actual, trained teachers are. If that's the case, I truly weep for America and its education system.

    I too can understand to a degree if a child is being bullied and/or they have severe learning disabilities, and has no access to the right facilities in the area. Other than that, no, I stand RESOLUTELY against the blanket provision of homeschooling because no matter what anyone says, and no offence here, not all parents are better equipped to teach their children that the professionals. They truly believe they do, but for some, it's coming from a very misguided place. It's just tragic that some governments shirk their responsibilities and fail their next generations in this fashion :(
     
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