Temporary Foster Care For Pets?

Discussion in Pets started by sissibombix • Sep 12, 2015.

  1. sissibombix

    sissibombixMember

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    I recently heard that you could become a temporary foster carer, was thinking of becoming one and wanted to hear some advice. My friend that works in a shelter told me that most of the time the puppies born there or that are brought there don't get the attention they need (because the shelter is so full and there aren't many voluntaries helping out). So I wouldn't mind bringing some home until they are adopted. What are your thoughts?
     
  2. Denis Hard

    Denis HardWell-Known Member

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    There are laws regulating foster care and animal rescue. So if you'll be keeping many animals in your home, you may have to ensure that you aren't breaking any laws, infractions which may end up costing you a lot of money.

    Though your intentions might be noble, don't wade into this until you are certain you won't be getting in trouble with the law.
     
  3. sissibombix

    sissibombixMember

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    I didn't really realize that thank you. I just thought about helping animals, and having a pet without the commitment.
    I'll look into the laws regarding foster animal care in my region and will take my action after I'm sure I'm not doing something illegal.
     
  4. gata montes

    gata montesActive Member

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    As someone who runs a small animal sanctuary for mistreated and abandoned cats and kittens I personally think its a wonderful idea.

    However - although the process generally requires having to successfully complete an application process - which will include a home check and if successful paying a yearly license fee - more importantly you need to be absolutely sure that you are aware of what it involves.

    Especially as although extremely rewarding - it is not only time consuming but also more often than not very, very hard on the emotions - particularly as homing foster care animals for a week or so to a couple of months is very different from having a family pet - for the simple reason - that most foster animals are fostered out because they are not yet ready for adoption - either because they are sick, injured, pregnant, scared or even just not used to being near other animals or people.

    So bearing in mind that it is the shelter that chooses which animals need to go to temporary homes and not the other way round and they will be looking at you to take on the responsibility of caring for the animal or animals they entrust into your care - if you feel that you can devote a considerable amount of your time to the foster animals needs - for example - possibly having to bottle feed a bunch of 2-week old kittens/puppies every 2-3 hours, monitoring and helping unwell moms that have just had a litters or having to give animals medication 2 – 4 times day - whilst at the same time helping to make them feel safe and secure - which is not always as easy as it sounds - as rescue animals and their behavior is often very unpredictable - then fostering is for you - if not it is better not to - as not only would you be letting the shelter down but the animals too.
     
  5. Pat

    PatWell-Known Member

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    I think it is a great idea although I would not be the right person to do something like that. I would get too attached to the animal and would not be able to let it go to a new home when the time came even if I had a dozen animals I would feel the same about all of them.
     
  6. Feneth

    FenethActive Member

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    It's a great way to help animals in need. One thing to keep in mind as you consider being an animal foster care parent is that different shelters and rescues have different foster home needs. The county shelter might put high-needs dogs in foster homes. Other private non-profit style rescues have ALL or MOST of their adoptable dogs in foster homes so while the dogs will have typical needs, they might be less intensive to care for than county shelter dogs that are ill or pregnant or need bottle fed.

    If you don't want to or can't bring them home, some shelters also have a socialization program that allows regular volunteers to essentially 'borrow' a dog to do activities with. It's great for the dog to have the extra activity and one-on-one attention and can let you get some quality time with animals without as much commitment.
     
  7. sidney

    sidneyWell-Known Member

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    I think taking care or fostering rescued animals is indeed a noble job, but sadly it's not for me, since I don't have the time and resources to look after them. What Gata Montes enumerated seems like a lot of responsibility, and you can't squeeze that in if you're working or have a family to take care of.
     
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