Tips for Buying a Shelter Cat

Discussion in Pets started by jneanz • Aug 17, 2014.

  1. jneanz

    jneanzActive Member

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    Last month, I got a cat from the shelter with disastrous results. It wasn't like one of those cat from hell episodes but the cat did have fits, or seizures, where she tended to get violent. I'm recovering from illness and can't afford a cat scratch.

    Some people said that a kitten would have been better but I think an older cat would have been better. My old cat was two and seemed to have some mental trauma.

    I would still like to get another cat but right now don't have the money for a full breed or exotic cat with a docile personality. Is this just a gamble when a person gets cats from the shelter?
     
  2. isabbbela

    isabbbelaWell-Known Member

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    Well first of all, if it's a shelter cat you would adopt it, not buy it :)
    I worked as a volunteer in a shelter before, and there are some cats they will say are very sweet and docile, but I was scratched by one or two. The truth is they get pretty stressed out in their cages all day on the shelter and it takes a while for them to get used to a new life with a new person. My tip is to be honest with the shelter volunteer that helps you: tell them you tried adopting a cat before but it seemed to have a trauma and got violent sometimes, that you were ill and need a very sweet tempered cat and if they could suggest the perfect cat for you to adopt. Also, go really slow with your new cat. Don't overdo anything. Pet it when it seems relaxed, try petting them and feeding them so that it recognizes petting as a good thing, and never get too close when they seem tense. Give it some space until it gets used to you, the new environment, the new house. Cats will warm up to you quickly if they have a sweet nature, but be patient and give them some space so they never feel threatened.
     
    #2Aug 17, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2014
  3. Mayvin

    MayvinActive Member

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    Its a good thing your cat wasn't as bad as some of those cats you see on that show. That was a trip! I always thought cats were more low maintenance, docile, and cuddly but after seeing that show it makes me want to rethink getting a cat in the future. I think pets are great in general but I think I've had my last pets after my two dogs. Their just a handful.
     
  4. Jessi

    Jessi<a href="http://www.quirkycookery.com">QuirkyCooke

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    Just talk to the shelter.

    If a cat has been at the shelter for a while, the staff is likely to know the temperament and if there are any issues with a particular cat. Most shelters really do want to find a good fit and they'll help find you a pet that you can take care of without it causing you or the pet undue problems.
     
  5. soultakerkage

    soultakerkageMember

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    All cats are different. It can time for them to adjust to a new situation. The best thing to do is respect the cat's warning signals so you don't get scratched and make your home as cat friendly as possible. As far as if there is anything medically wrong, it is always a good idea to take a new pet to the vet for a checkup to see if there are any future health issues. Hope it works out for you.
     
  6. mariee

    marieeActive Member

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    Wait what happened with the cat you got? Did you give it back to the shelter? Couldn't one of the volunteers help you pick out one that fits the personality you want, since they know them.

    Another option, if it's available in your area, is to search for a rescue group or independent rescuer. Usually they operate on a smaller scale than shelters, and instead of keeping the cats in cages they will give them foster homes until they are adopted. So if you adopt a cat that's living in a foster home then it's likely the cat will be more used to humans and less stressed, and also they tend to be able to socialize better with other pets since most rescuers and foster homes have more than one cat or dog. In my area some rescuers are even willing to take the pet to you if they are too far for you to go, some of the larger rescue organizations even send pets to other states on plane. Facebook is a good place to search, at least in my area there are adoption groups where different organizations and individuals post their available pets. Another good site is Petfinder.
     
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