What Reduction Does A Product Have To Have For You To Consider It A Bargain?

Discussion in Shopping Discussion started by Famlieski • Jun 11, 2016.

  1. Famlieski

    FamlieskiNew Member

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    Sometimes I get emails from companies with reduction codes, and there's definitely a level of reduction that I need for something to be considered a bargain. 5%, 10% and 15% off always feel miniscule, for example. Usually I need something to be at least 50% of its general price to consider it a good deal, but 60% or more to consider it an actual bargain. When it comes to going to supermarkets and looking at the reduced to clear sections, if something is reduced by 80%, I will pretty much always buy it even if I don't see an immediate use for it. My freezer is full of such purchases.

    Does anyone else have a cut off point for what is considered a "bargain"?
     
  2. Denis Hard

    Denis HardWell-Known Member

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    A bargain for me would be a discount no matter how small on something I need. A 5% for me is fine if there is no better deal somewhere else.

    What I never will do though is buying something I don't need no matter how cheap it might be at that time. This is one trick retailers use to lure people into spending money on things they can do without. .
     
  3. Theo

    TheoWell-Known Member

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    I think a bargain is 50% off, but if a company offers 5% across all ranges which isn't usually discounted (like Apple laptops) then that is a bargain. I do look at the terms and conditions, and whether there is a minimum spend to see if it's worth it.
     
  4. Famlieski

    FamlieskiNew Member

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    I don't buy stuff I'll never use, just stuff I hadn't planned on purchasing. That way, my freezer is always stocked and I never "don't have anything in for dinner". For example, I may go to the supermarket and see that they have broccoli at a massive reduction. Even though I have no meals planned with broccoli that week, I'll still stock up because it can go in the freezer and I will use it at some point, at which point I don't have to pay full price.
     
  5. GemmaRowlands

    GemmaRowlandsActive Member

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    It depends what it is, and what I need it for. If the reduction is on essentials that I need in my home then even a small discount is great, but if it's an item that I don't particularly need, and I just want, then a larger reduction would be necessary for me to be able to see it as a bargain. So it very much depends on the situation, really.
     
  6. cocolgooh

    cocolgoohActive Member

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    I agree with those saying it depends on the item. 5% off a laptop is a big chunk whereas 5% off a loaf of bread isn't very much. With big ticket items, any saving is a bonus. With littler things though like groceries I tend to look for over 50% off unless it's something I plan to buy anyway. Then I'll take the reduced item over a full price one because it's still saving me money, but I don't tend to see it so much as a bargain.
     
  7. Sydney M.

    Sydney M.Member

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    Personally, I won't really consider a discount a real bargain unless it is about 40% off or more. Although 5%-35% is still something, I feel that it's not enough to save you a whole lot of money. I love sites that give you a large discount off your first purchase for signing up/making an account. For example, today I signed up for Shein.com and now, if I order a purchase, I get 40% off! I just think that for most people, a 5% or 10% discount on even your entire purchase isn't enough to bribe someone to visit a site.
     
  8. Hedonologist

    HedonologistActive Member

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    25% minimum I'd say. I saw a box of tea bag reduced from £2.29 to £2.00 today and I didn't really think that was anything to get excited about. But when another brand was reduce from £1.80 to £1.00 I bought 4 boxes on the spot to take advantage of it. Clearly a mutually beneficial arrangement there.
     
  9. sidney

    sidneyWell-Known Member

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    I agree that any discount is better than having no discount at all, and it's also relative to the item. If you're considering to buy a TV or a washing machine, then a 5% or 10% discount is considered substantial already. If the item is quite cheap, then of course the discount is negligible.
     
  10. steph84

    steph84Active Member

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    Anything under 20% does not feel like a sale to me because tax here is almost 10% so you don't see the prices drop. Anything above 30% is what I consider a sale and 45% to 50% is a deal for me. Anything over 50% is clearance city for me and that is my target shopping range!
     
  11. gata montes

    gata montesActive Member

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    For me - although a discount of any kind is always welcome on anything I purchase - especially as they're not particularly forthcoming where I live as discounts of any kind are extremely rare - its only when items are marked down to around 60-80% that I consider them to be a bargain.

    Simply because - as most deals are planned to be profitable for the manufacture and the retailer rather than the consumer these days - and because of that - the discount is already priced into the product at the time of manufacture - meaning that the RRP is normally set way above what the goods are expected to sell at and way, way more than the retailer has paid for them - its generally only when goods are being sold with a 60-70% discount that you would actually be buying goods at nearer their true value.
     
  12. Lushlala

    LushlalaWell-Known Member

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    I appreciate all discounts, but for it to feel like a proper good bargain, it has to be something like 40%+ off the RRP. I'm not a huge fan of those that say 5% off, although I guess it's relative. Also, the discounted items have to be in good working condition and really be worth it. One of my absolute favourite UK stores, River Island has the tendency of putting on sale some rather tatty items from many seasons ago that I sometimes feel belong in the bin.The sort of stuff i wouldn't even take if it were given free LOL I decided not to check out their sales for that reason, and instead buy their stuff full price, unless something really good in the sale happens to catch my eye that is.
     
  13. ThesePretzels

    ThesePretzelsMember

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    Anything below a 20% discount doesn't elicit a response, but 30% and above is where a discount gets my attention if it's a product I have intention to buy. At 50% it's a real bargain and I start to consider brands I wouldn't normally. For clothing often times that's enough to convince me to make a purchase, but for most else that's a great deal.
     
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